How To Clean Water Filter?

How To Clean Water Filter?

When it comes to filtering water, nothing does a better job than a good quality water filter. The problem is that most of the time these filters get clogged up with debris and dirt rendering them useless. Fortunately, there are some simple tricks you can use to clean your water filter if they become clogged.
How To Clean Water Filter

What Is A Water Filter?

A water filter is a device that can be used to remove contaminants from water, making it cleaner and safer to drink. They are usually built around a substance called activated carbon which removes contaminants by trapping them on its porous surface. This means water flows through the activated carbon fairly quickly, but pollutants become trapped on the inside of the filter stopping the water flow until they are dugout. This is why filters need regular cleaning so you can ensure your drinking water continues to be clear and safe for use.

A good quality water filter will come with several different stages of filtration including fine organic particles, chlorine, and chemicals like lead or arsenic. This means that once it has passed through one stage of filtering (activated carbon), it is clear of all large objects like big hulks of dirt, but still contains some other contaminants like chlorine.

Why Do Water Filters Get Clogged?

There are many different types of contaminants that could potentially get into your drinking water which include things like sediments, chlorine, minerals, organic compounds, and even bacteria. The number one reason your filter becomes clogged up is that you are not changing it regularly enough. Water filters should be changed roughly every six months, but this also depends on the quality of the filter and how badly it needs to be cleaned.

Remember, your water filter will only work as well as the condition it is in so try to clean or replace your filter before it becomes too dirty or clogged for use. Just like any other type of filter, they rely on trapping contaminants which can become quickly filled up if there is a lot of dirt in your water.

How Does A Water Filter Work?

The basic water filter works quite simply by using gravity to push the water through a very fine porous membrane. This membrane is rolled up into a small cartridge so it can fit inside your countertop or under-sink system. Once this membrane is in place, you run the cold tap until the water starts running nice and slowly before putting another clean plug of water into it. When you turn the cold tap on again, this will now be forced through the membrane trapping any contaminants inside.

Can I Clean The Water Filters And Reuse Them?

Yes, you can clean water filters and reuse them. The only thing that may happen is that you will need to change the filter cartridge more often than usual. If you are not sure how to do this by yourself then contact the manufacturer of your filter for more information on how to care for it.

Why Should You Clean Your Water Filters?

The main reason you should clean your water filter is to ensure it continues to be effective. If your water filter becomes clogged up with dirt and debris, this will mean that there will be less space for the water to be filtered through. Remember, this means that any dirt or bacteria in your water will not be filtered out until after they pass through your filter which poses a serious risk to anyone who uses the dirty old filter.

How To Clean Water Filter:

Sediment Filters: Step-By-Step Instructions

  1. First, remove the filter container from under your sink or countertop.
  2. Second, turn off the cold water supply to filter by closing hot and cold faucets. If you are unable to do this manually, shut them off at the main shut-off valve which is generally located outside of your home near the meter.
  3. Third, disassemble filters into their individual components including sediment pre-filter canister, activated carbon cartridge, housing lid, and gasket.
  4. Next, remove any hoses attached to the filter system – you may need to use a wrench if they are too tight or too stuck on for hand twisting motion. These hoses should be cleaned after so do not discard them. You can rinse these out thoroughly with water.
  5. Now, remove each individual filter by twisting counter-clockwise. Most sediment pre-filters will unscrew off the top of the canister unit while most activated carbon cartridges will have a hose adapter to twist on and off of the housing lid.
  6. Fill up your sink or large bucket with equal amounts of warm water mixed with the household bleach solution for cleaning filters (2 teaspoons of bleach per gallon of hot tap water).
  7. Next, submerge all filters into this mixture for at least two minutes before removing them out to rinse with cold running tap water. You may need to use a brush or scrubber sponge if the filter is very dirty. Removing the tank/water container lid is often difficult, but try soaking it in your bleach solution for at least 15 minutes to loosen the hard water stains before scrubbing them clean.
  8. Allow each filter component to air dry completely on a clean towel or paper towels before reassembling. Make sure they are allowed to fully dry without any moisture remaining before placing back onto the Sediment Filter Canister units – especially important with an activated carbon cartridge hose adapter if you do not want contamination of bacteria or mold growing inside.
  9. Once ready after complete drying time, simply place all parts back into their original places and reattach hoses by hand twisting clockwise. Do not use a wrench as you will damage the rubber O-ring gasket seal inside. Hoses should now be tight and secure.
  10. Finally, turn on both cold and hot water faucets to flush out the entire household plumbing system – this should clear away any debris that may have gotten stuck inside while your Sediment Water Filter Canister was disassembled. Run the water for at least three minutes or until you can smell a strong scent of bleach in the air when standing near the kitchen or bathroom sink area. This will ensure all cleaning residue is flushed away from your home’s main water supply pipes.
  11. After flushing your Sediment Filter Canister, place another clean filter cartridge into position by carefully setting it onto the second holding bracket attached to unit housing. Make sure there is no dust or dirt accumulated around or under the bottom edge of filters.
  12. Now, replace the lid by lining up two white plastic “nubs” at top of the main canister unit with their corresponding openings on your Sediment Filter Housing. Rotate the lid counter-clockwise until it sets into place.
  13. Replace filter container back under sink or countertop cabinet – do not forget to turn on the cold water supply to filter before turning hot water faucet back on for final test of proper function. You are now ready to begin enjoying purified drinking water once again!

Carbon (Charcoal) Cartridges: Step-By-Step Cleaning Instructions:

  1. First, locate the activated carbon cartridge that filters your home’s tap water. Most of these cartridges will have a white plastic canister container with a black rubber hose attached to a lid on top.
  2. Loosen and remove the lid from the top of the activated carbon cartridge unit by hand twisting counter-clockwise. You may need to use a wrench if it is too tight or too stuck on tightly for simple twist motion by hand. Be careful not to damage the rubber gasket seal inside as you do this. If your filter system has two hoses sticking out from the bottom of the main unit, then you should disconnect both at this time – one is simply the drain line and does not need cleaning; we’re only interested in the one leading to your house’s water system.
  3. Once the lid is removed, you will see the activated carbon cartridge inside – carefully remove it by gripping the black base of the unit and gently pulling upwards. You may need to use your fingers or pliers if it’s too tight for easy pull-up action.
  4. Now that the activated charcoal cartridge has been removed from the main canister housing, fill up the sink basin with hot tap water (not boiling) before adding several cleanser tablets like Kaboom ! or Tetra Algae Destroyer (found at most fish supply stores). The number of cleanser tablets needed to fully submerge this filter component depends on how large it is; typically I would start off with three Epsom salts type cleanser tablets per gallon of warm tap water and adjust upwards if required.
  5. Once the sink is filled, place the activated carbon cartridge with rubber hose end down into the water for ten minutes or more before removing and rinsing under running cold tap water. You should see black residue begin to come off filter material when you move it around in the basin by hand – this means your filter is now clean and ready to be replaced according to manufacturer’s guidelines (usually between 6 months to 1 year of usage). If you do not plan on replacing your charcoal filter cartridge, then simply follow step 7 below.
  6. Now that your cartridge has been left immersed in cleanser solution for the recommended time, remove and rinse thoroughly under running cold tap water until the gasket area is completely clear of any residue or dirt.
  7. Next, wipe clean the outside of the entire filter cartridge housing by hand with a dry towel or paper towel – remember, you want to remove all traces of water on both internal and external surfaces for this receptacle component. If your activated carbon cartridge is very large in size, use an old rag first to wipe down the filter canister before finishing up with a dry terrycloth-type material.
  8. Once internal & external cleansing has been completed using cleanser solution or plain water, place the new activated charcoal cartridge back into the main canister housing by carefully lowering it downwards until the black base is seated securely onto the rubber gasket area at bottom of the main unit’s internal chamber. You will feel air vacuum pressure being created as the rubber hose end of the activated carbon cartridge touches the rubber gasket; this is normal and no cause for concern on your part.
  9. Once the charcoal filter cartridge has been replaced, re-attach the lid to the top of the activated carbon canister unit by hand twisting clockwise, first tightening the lid on loosely by only one quarter turn counter-clockwise first before adding the remaining three-quarters of a final clockwise twist onto main housing’s top area. Be careful not to over tighten as you could break the plastic lid or cross-thread it inside threads of the main housing (if using pliers, be sure to hold the bottom of the body with the other hand). Do not use excessive downward force when placing the lid back onto the black base either!
  10.   Connect white drain hose from activated filter cartridge back into the blue drain arm that you removed from underneath your kitchen sink cabinet during step one. Make sure the hose is securely in place by hand twisting clockwise to tighten the connection. 

Modular Filters: Step-By-Step Cleaning Instructions:

  1. Remove the activated carbon cartridge from the modular filter by gently pulling up on the rubber hose while twisting counterclockwise with the other hand. Once removed you can place the activated carbon cartridge into the sink basin for cleansing or simply put it in the garbage, depending on if you plan to replace it with a new one or not.
  2. Using pliers if necessary, remove black rubber O-ring gasket at bottom of main housing unit – do this by wedging fingers underneath metal band which encircles underside of the entire unit and pulls upwards slightly until the gasket is free at the top edge of where fingertip has wedge itself underneath the metal band. You may need to twist this small rubber piece back and forth during removal in order to get it out more easily. Replace with a new black O-ring gasket once you have the activated carbon cartridge back into the main housing unit.
  3. Once the rubber gasket has been freed from underneath the metal band, wipe clean the exterior of the entire housing unit plus the rubber O-ring gasket area using a dry rag or paper towel. If your activated filter cartridge is very large in size, use an old cloth first to wipe down the inside wall of the canister before finishing up with a dry terrycloth-type material. Be sure not to leave behind any debris on either surface for best performance results when reinserting the cartridge back inside the housing unit later on during the cleansing process.
  4. Place modular filter upright into sink basin or other receptacles that will allow you full access underneath it while you perform the cleansing process. Using a bottle brush, gently scrub the white plastic mesh filter clean from the inside out ( please note that you do NOT need to completely remove outer housing in order to access this device’s interior – simply lift it up slightly while working underneath).
  5. If your activated carbon cartridge is very large in size, use an old rag first to wipe down the insides of both ends of the cartridge plus underneath rubber gasket area (you can also place this into the sink basin during step two if desired).
  6. Once internal & external cleansing has been completed using cleanser solution or plain water, place new activated charcoal cartridge back into main housing body by carefully lowering unit downwards until the black base is seated securely onto rubber O-ring gasket. Turn filter counterclockwise to lock into place, then use pliers if necessary to twist black hose onto drain arm clockwise until securely in place.
  7. Replace black drain hose underneath sink cabinet by using slipping it back into the opening at bottom of the unit. Secure hose by hand twisting clockwise, first securing loosely with only one-quarter turn before adding final three-quarters turn atop main housing body/unit itself.
  8. Finally, rinse the activated carbon cartridge under the faucet again to remove all cleanser residue. Drain water from cartridge now that it has been cleaned & replaced, making sure that all traces of soap are removed properly before placing new charcoal filter cartridge back inside main housing unit for next filtering cycle whenever it is needed.

Otherwise, you can place the activated carbon filter cartridge inside a sink for cleansing to remove soap & other chemicals from the unit itself. Simply make a solution of cleanser or plain water and gently scrub all parts including the hose with a small brush provided to remove any build-up of dirt/debris that might have been missed while cleaning by hand.

Follow these instructions every 2–3 months when using this type of modular filter in your home to ensure best performance results – sometimes more often if installed underneath very hard water areas where mineral deposits are likely going to form more rapidly on surfaces during the filtering process.

Brita: Step-By-Step Cleaning Instructions:

  1. Begin by removing the activated carbon cartridge from its housing unit, then remove the black hose from the drain arm at bottom of the main housing body.
  2. Be sure to keep the jet/faucet nozzle attached to your sink’s faucet during the cleaning process – this installs with a simple twist motion onto the faucet’s top section, ensuring that no damage will result if you follow these instructions properly.
  3. Fill the Brita pitcher filter housing up halfway with warm water mixed with either cleanser solution or plain water, making sure that the lower end is submerged underneath liquid inside the container (do not fill past top red line inside the container). Add mild dishwashing soap as well for best results before screwing the black hose back onto the drain arm clockwise until secure.
  4. Shake the unit up & down five times, then hold it steady in one position & allow liquid to run out of the jet nozzle for best results before changing positions (repeat this process another three times).
  5. Once activated carbon cartridge replacement has been completed, wash both filter housing parts with liquid as well (do not submerge top section or faucet base) by either using your sink basin or bathtub to perform the cleansing procedure.
  6. After all components have been washed inside and out, reassemble pitcher container by first inserting new activated carbon cartridge inside main housing unit (make sure that rubber gasket is positioned correctly), then replace black hose onto drain arm clockwise at bottom of housing body by hand twisting until secure.
  7. Rinse the new activated carbon filter cartridge under the running faucet water, then allow it to dry completely before placing back inside the unit for the next filtering cycle. You can also clean the pitcher container itself by rinsing under your sink’s faucet as well, remembering to lift clip from the bottom of the housing body before cleaning inside & out with cleanser solution or plain water. Wash jet nozzle as well if desired by removing it from the sink base and scrubbing clean using the small brush provided.
  8. The last step is to simply replace your Brita pitcher onto a flat surface where it will be ready for the next time you need filtered water anywhere in your home!

Reverse Osmosis Filters

Reverse osmosis filters are considered to be the best water filter manufactured on the planet. It is more of a purifying system than just an appliance, and it can actually remove more impurities than any other system available.

A reverse osmosis filtration system consists of 3 different pieces: A plastic or stainless steel storage tank that holds tap water before it is filtered through a semi-permeable membrane. The membrane acts as a barrier that only allows the pure water molecules to pass through a spigot with a separate faucet used for filling containers. A waste line that runs from the drain in your sink into the storage tank when you turn on the faucet connected to this unit. Reverse Osmosis filters usually require a separate faucet at the kitchen sink or in a garage, tool shed, or workshop that is capable of running water into this storage tank.

Reverse osmosis filters can remove up to 97% of chlorine found in tap water, which helps to purify it for drinking purposes. They are also very effective at eliminating other chemicals like pesticides and herbicides, but they will not usually filter out many common minerals like calcium and magnesium.

The downside to using this type of system is that you must install both 1/4 inch connectors on the ends of your water lines leading out from the faucets because standard fittings will not work with this filtration system. That means you’ll need some special tools (which are often included with the purchase of a new RO filtration system because most manufacturers know how difficult it can be to find the fittings you need in order to hook up your water lines to this appliance).

Most retail hardware stores do not carry these 1/4 inch connectors, so you must only buy them from providers that specialize in plumbing supplies. They are usually available at wholesale prices because large residential jobs are usually what plumbers are working on when they have extra ones left over after completing their own contracted jobs.

RO filters should be changed every 6 months (more frequently if you notice any sign of deterioration or leakage), and there is no way under normal conditions for any harmful chemicals like chlorine or fluoride to get through this type of filter media once it has been installed in your home.

Different systems have different capacities for filtering water, so be sure you are working with a reputable company that will offer both the system itself along ongoing technical service if you decide to purchase one of these units. You can expect to pay anywhere from $800 to $1,200 for one of these systems depending on its size, making them out of reach for many homeowners. Reverse osmosis filters are only sold by licensed plumbers who will usually install them at no additional charge when they are installing other water appliances or fixtures in your home.

RO units need to be serviced annually because they can become clogged with mineral deposits over time unless you live in an area the tap water is extremely soft (like Pelham, Alabama). Most units are manufactured with a faucet that will need to be disconnected prior to service in order for the plumber to remove the storage tank and replace the filter cartridge.

RO systems installed outside your home can sometimes be connected directly into your main water supply line, but this is not always practical if you live in an area that experiences extremely cold winters because there’s no easy way to drain these filters completely so they don’t freeze up after being exposed to sub-zero temperatures.

How To Unclog A PUR Water Filter

Many people make the mistake of assuming their PUR water filter will never need service because it is designed to remove up to 99% of dissolved chemicals found in water. The only way these filters can become clogged and stop filtering the contaminants from your drinking and cooking water over time is if you live in an area where your tap water has a high mineral content (like Pelham, Alabama).

Even though chlorine is added to municipal tap water supplies all around the United States, it does not affect most reverse osmosis systems because the chlorine evaporates very quickly when exposed to open air. Only RO systems connected directly into a water supply line will be affected if you add enough bleach or other disinfecting chemicals to kill germs. The same thing goes for fluoride, which will not affect most RO systems unless you pour hundreds of gallons of it directly into your main water line.

Another misconception about reverse osmosis filters is that they are designed to remove minerals from drinking water. Your PUR water filter is only effective at filtering out chlorine, the bad taste and odor caused by sulfur, fluoride when present in high concentrations, arsenic, perchlorate (rocket fuel), hexavalent chromium (a toxic metal also known as “Erin Brockovich” chemical), lead, mercury, nitrates/nitrites, radionuclides like uranium in certain parts of the United States, and some pharmaceuticals that have been shown to cause cancerous tumors when ingested over a period of time. Remember that most of the contaminants removed by a PUR water filter are not naturally occurring minerals found in your drinking and cooking water.

Even if you believe you will never need to replace your PUR water filter, which is unlikely as long as you live in an area with a softening plant that adds salt to the municipal tap water supply, there’s always a chance it could become damaged from being dropped or physically abused. It’s also possible for these filters to clog over time due to sedimentary deposits of calcium and magnesium, which gradually dissolve when exposed to warm or hot tap water. If this happens, all you have to do is follow the “cleaning” instructions below:

– Disconnect your PUR faucet from its base before removing its storage tank. If you’ve already installed your PUR faucet into a sink, first turn off the main water supply valve feeding into the house.

– Remove all of the fittings from inside your storage tank using an adjustable wrench. This will allow plumbers to remove the sediment filter cartridge hidden on the side of your tank for cleaning or replacement.

– Turn over your entire PUR storage tank so it is resting on its top with its faucet positioned downward.

– Fill up your storage tank with warm tap water until it reaches just below the rim where the fittings are located. Add 1/4 cup of household bleach, replace all of the fittings tightly, then reconnect your faucet back into its base and turn on your main water supply valve.

– Run your PUR water filter for 5-10 minutes to flush out all of the dirt and sediment clogging up the fine pores on the surface of your reverse osmosis sediment cartridge. Turn off your faucet, then remove its storage tank from above and pour out any standing water that might be inside it.

– If you removed your sediment cartridge, soak it in a tub filled with warm tap water and 1/4 cup of baking soda. This will eliminate any mold or mildew growth caused by bleach being left inside your filter after rinsing it out with pure chlorine. Rinse off your purified drinking water filter using a garden hose until all traces of white powder are, then let dry overnight under direct sunlight.

– Place your thoroughly cleaned sediment filter cartridge back into its storage tank, pour in 1/4 cup of baking soda, then fill up the tank with cold tap water until it reaches just below the rim where your fittings are located.

– Make sure all of your fittings are firmly tightened before reconnecting your PUR faucet to a kitchen sink or a refrigerator icemaker line. Run the water for 5-10 minutes after allowing it to drip down from top to bottom. If you have a hot water dispenser on your refrigerator that uses reverse osmosis filtration, you MUST install a dedicated tee connection into one of its main supply lines. The reason is that household bleach left inside a hot water dispenser that is used to make tea, hot chocolate or instant soup will leave a strong chlorine taste and odor.

– Replace your storage tank back onto the top of your faucet tower after all of the bleach has been flushed out into your sink by running it for 10 minutes. Run water through your PUR filter again until you can’t smell any more bleach coming out from where your faucet meets its body.

– For maximum effectiveness, use household bleach (sodium hypochlorite) that contains 4% to 6% pure chlorine on both ends of this first cartridge or sediment prefilter every other month. This will not only improve the quality of its filtration abilities but also cleanse itself of polluted particles which could clog its fine pores over time.

Should I Clean The Water Filter Housings?

Water filter housings, or “canisters”, built for trapping chlorine and sediment particles inside a carbon cartridge require cleaning every 3-6 months depending on how hard your city’s tap water is. If you fail to do this, it will reduce the performance levels of any carbon filter media that is packed tightly in between your mesh within 12 to 18 months.

A water housing that contains an ion exchange resin bead tank (softening system) or KDF/GAC cartridge must have its bottom opening rinsed out with vinegar every 2-3 weeks under low pressure from a garden hose. This will eliminate mineral deposits around its base which could cause leaks over time. In cases where the bottom section of housing has been badly clogged up by sediment, it should be replaced with a new one.

Please note that all sediment filter housings come equipped with bottom drain plugs for routine cleaning purposes. The only time you should remove these is if your cartridge becomes clogged up too badly or when replacing it altogether. It should have an arrow-shaped design on its top surface to show the direction in which to align the cartridge correctly.

How Often Do Water Filters Need to be Replaced?

Water filters, whether they are carbon-based or use high-end GAC (granular activated carbon), KDF85, sediment filter cartridges, reverse osmosis membrane tanks, ion exchange resin bead columns, or metal housings should be replaced every 18 to 24 months. You must also change the gasket/o-rings on each housing every 2 years at the very least, especially if it exposes you to chlorinated water on a regular basis.

Is Cleaning Better Than Replacing?

Well, this really depends on the extent of how often it is clogged up with sediments or polluted particles. The longer you wait to either clean or replace your water filter, the more contaminated tap water will pass through its carbon/GAC mixture before reaching your glass instead.

We recommend that everyone who owns a home filtration system change their filter out at least twice per year to ensure maximum protection against infectious organisms which could cause disease. This also gives manufacturers an excuse not to sell replacement cartridges as frequently since they don’t know what you’re actually doing with their product.

What Causes Sediment Buildup?

Sediment buildup is caused by the physical trapping of sediments that normally flows through your water filter housing. It can also occur over time due to city tap water which contains rust, sand, or clay particles and makes its way inside a mesh prefilter.

Water contaminants such as lead (Pb), chromium (Cr), and fluoride (F-) are usually bound together with other toxic metals and chemicals derived from industrial waste, agricultural run-off, and ground erosion. This causes it to become harder for homeowners to clean or flush contaminants out from their water filters.

Sediments containing minerals, metals, or rocks can easily build up over time by adding a mesh prefilter to the bottom of any sediment cartridge. This will prevent sediments from entering your main filtration system and being trapped inside its carbon cavity.

If you have been unfortunate enough to have purchased a water filter with no prefilter, you must know that it needs regular cleaning every 3 months. If you were to replace a cartridge without cleaning it first, combined chlorine would mix together with organic chemicals and create harmful chemicals such as trihalomethanes (THMs) which could cause disease.

How Can I Dispose Of Old Water Filters?

It is never a good idea to throw your old water filter cartridges into the dustbin or garbage can because they could end up contaminating groundwater. In fact, most local recycling centres will not accept them for this very reason.

You must contact your city office and see if they have a hazardous waste disposal bin where you can take used cartridges from home filtration systems. For safety reasons, make sure that these cartridges are wrapped with a plastic bag first before throwing them out!

Homeowners must keep in mind that each time their water filter cartridge becomes clogged up with sediments, infectious microorganisms such as cryptosporidium and giardia lamblia become harder for chlorine to kill. This makes it easier for unfiltered tap water to make its way through your filter and into your glass.

If you have a high-quality multi-stage sediment cartridge that uses KDF or GAC, then it can last up to 4 years before needing a replacement. In fact, the vast majority of homeowners in North America who own a multi-stage carbon/GAC cartridge change it once per year during their spring cleaning ritual!

What Happens If You Do Not Change Your Water Filters?

When homeowners do not change their water filter cartridges in a timely manner, it could lead to serious health problems which are associated with drinking contaminated tap water.

Sediment particles contain heavy metals such as mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd) that can pose a threat to human health if ingested. The longer the cartridge remains clogged up, the more time these contaminants will have to accumulate within your home filtration system.

Don’t forget that all public water systems use chlorine or chloramine gases during treatment to kill microorganisms. This chemical additive becomes less effective at killing infectious organisms each time your filter cartridge is clogged up with sediment dust!

Bottled Water Vs. Filtered Water, Which Option Is Better?

If you place a high-quality multi-stage sediment cartridge at the beginning of your water filter housing, then you can expect to get better tasting and clean drinking water without any sediments passing through.

When filtered water is compared to bottled water, homeowners may come across several studies which claim that tap water is just as safe and effective in removing contaminants from our bodies.

However, it is important for homeowners not to forget about disinfection byproducts (DBPs) such as chloroform (CHCl₄) and bromodichloromethane (BDCM). These chemicals are very toxic if ingested in large amounts over time and could cause organ damage or cancer.

It is therefore much safer for homeowners to use a multi-stage sediment/carbon pre-filter to remove DPBs from tap water before it passes through a finer GAC filter for disinfection.

Harmful Contaminants Effects On Health

The World Health Organization (WHO) has claimed that long-term exposure to DBPs such as chloroform and bromodichloromethane could make humans more susceptible to developing colon and bladder cancer in their lifetime.

Another thing which homeowners should not forget about is the fact that chlorine gas will mix with organic chemicals in water and form disinfection byproducts which are very toxic. The longer these chemicals remain in tap water before it gets filtered, then the greater risk we have of contracting certain diseases such as cancer.

  1. Microorganisms:

Bacteria, viruses, cysts, parasites, and other unfilterables can appear in your drinking water for a variety of reasons – including corrosion inside your home’s plumbing system. The more time these contaminants have to attach themselves to the surface of sediment particles before getting filtered out, then the greater risk you have of getting ill from drinking tap water over time.

  1. Organic Contaminants:

Organic Chemicals are contaminants that are considered to be man-made. We have no way of knowing what these chemicals are or how they got into our tap water, but one thing is for sure – if you inhale or ingest them in high enough concentrations over an extended period of time, then the odds are stacked against your good health!

Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOCs) are contaminants that readily vaporize into the air. Sometimes they can escape from home filtration systems if cartridge housings have not been properly tightened on your water filter system.

A large number of homeowners who consume contaminated drinking water each day may soon notice the following health effects:  fatigue, headaches, nausea, chronic inflammation, kidney damage, liver damage, and even cancer!

  1. Inorganic Contaminants:

Inorganic Chemicals are a good example of hazardous contaminants which can be found in tap water around the world. Some of these contaminants include pesticides, nitrates, sulfates, and sodium compounds.

Arsenic is a common inorganic contaminant that is added to water supplies to kill bacteria and other harmful microorganisms. However, if this chemical becomes exposed to air over an extended period of time (such as when test samples are being collected) then it can turn into a toxic gas called arsenic trioxide.

Chlorine dioxide is another common inorganic chemical that has been added to drinking water for over 100 years. It is currently being used by most water treatment plants around the world, but it can cause respiratory problems or even cancer if ingested in high enough concentrations.

Chloramines are also a good example of hazardous inorganic chemicals that can appear in tap water. In many cases, these harmful contaminants are added to the water supply as a means of disinfection. Tap water treated with chloramines can cause health problems such as anemia, asthma, and even cancer if it is consumed for a long enough period of time.

Copper is a common inorganic contaminant that can appear in tap water or household dust. If ingested on a daily basis over an extended period of time, then copper can cause health problems such as stomach ulcers, diarrhea, liver damage, and even death!

Cadmium is another common inorganic chemical that is added to tap water as a cleansing agent. This contaminant becomes poisonous if consumed over an extended period of time, and some of its short-term health effects include liver damage, headaches, abdominal pain, vomiting, and diarrhea.

Lead is also a common inorganic chemical that can be found in drinking water throughout the world. Over an extended period of time, lead can cause severe health problems such as high blood pressure, muscle damage, brain damage, and even death!

Chromium is a common inorganic contaminant that is added to drinking water as a cleansing agent. If consumed over an extended period of time, this chemical can cause health problems such as liver damage, stomach ulcers, and even cancer!

Nitrates are also a good example of hazardous inorganic chemicals that can appear in tap water. In many cases, these harmful contaminants are found naturally occurring in the water supply or they skim into it from fertilizers and soil erosion. Nitrates can cause significant health problems such as ” Blue Baby Syndrome,” a condition that prevents babies from receiving enough oxygen in their blood cells.

Fluoride, also known as hydrofluorosilicic acid, is another common inorganic chemical that can be found in tap water. Although the US government has deemed this contaminant as “safe for consumption,” recent studies have shown that fluoride can cause damage to bone structures, lower children’s IQ scores, and even produce cancerous tumors on kidneys or rats!

Mercury is also a common inorganic chemical that can appear naturally occurring in the water supply. This particular contaminant has been linked to various types of cancer, including stomach cancer, colon cancer, and even leukemia!

Selenium is another common inorganic contaminant that can sometimes be found naturally occurring in drinking water. Over an extended period of time, selenium can cause health problems such as brittle teeth, hair loss, and even cancer!

Sulfates are also a good example of hazardous inorganic chemicals that can appear in tap water. In many cases, these harmful contaminants are found naturally occurring in the water supply or they skim into it from fertilizers and soil erosion. Sulfates can cause skin irritations, diarrhea, low blood pressure, damaged kidneys, and even cancer!

Thallium is a common inorganic contaminant that can appear naturally occurring in the water supply. This contaminant has been linked to various types of cancer, including lung, bladder, and even kidney cancers!

Zinc is also a common inorganic chemical that can be added to tap water as a cleansing agent. If consumed over an extended period of time, this chemical can cause severe health problems such as nausea, vomiting, and even death!

Pesticides are yet another good example of hazardous inorganic chemicals which can appear in tap water. In many cases, these dangerous contaminants are found naturally occurring in the water supply or they skim into it from agricultural pesticides used to maintain farm crops. Numerous studies have concluded that pesticides can cause significant health problems such as infertility, cancer, and birth defects!

Herbicides are also a good example of hazardous inorganic chemicals that can appear in tap water. In many cases, these dangerous contaminants are found naturally occurring in the water supply or they skim into it from agricultural pesticides used to maintain farm crops. Numerous studies have concluded that herbicides can cause significant health problems such as infertility, cancer, and birth defects!

Zinc is also a common inorganic chemical that can be added to tap water as a cleansing agent. If consumed over an extended period of time, this chemical can cause severe health problems such as nausea, vomiting, and even death!

Silver is also a common inorganic contaminant that can appear naturally occurring in the water supply. If consumed over an extended period of time, this chemical can cause health problems such as skin irritation, stomach illness, and even cancer!

Nickel is linked to various types of cancer, including lung, stomach, and even kidney cancers.

Iron can cause significant health problems such as stomach cancer and even death.

Manganese can also be found naturally occurring in the water supply. In many cases, this dangerous contaminant skims into it from industrial waste or is added to tap water as a cleansing agent. If consumed over an extended period of time, manganese can cause health problems such as serious illness and even death!

Calcium can also be found naturally occurring in the water supply. Consuming this chemical over an extended period of time can result in numerous health problems such as damage to bones, lower children’s IQ scores, and even cancer!

Cadmium is also a common inorganic contaminant that can appear naturally occurring in the water supply or it can skim into it from fertilizers and soil erosion. If consumed over an extended period of time, this chemical can result in serious health problems such as kidney failure, lung cancer, and premature birth!

Magnesium is a common inorganic contaminant that can be added to tap water as a cleansing agent. Consuming this chemical over an extended period of time can result in health problems such as nausea, vomiting, and even death!

Antimony is a toxic chemical that can be found in tap water. In many cases, this dangerous contaminant skims into it from industrial waste or is added to tap water as a cleansing agent. If consumed over an extended period of time, antimony can result in damage to the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and heart.

Barium is also a common inorganic chemical that can be added to tap water as a cleansing agent. Consuming this chemical over an extended period of time can result in serious health problems such as vomiting, diarrhea, and even death!

Beryllium is also a common inorganic chemical that can be found naturally occurring in the water supply or it can skim into it from fertilizers and soil erosion. If consumed over an extended period of time, this chemical can cause serious health problems such as cancer, lung disease, and even death!

MTBE (Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether) is an organic chemical that can cause various types of cancer.

Aluminum is also a common inorganic chemical that can be found naturally occurring in the water supply or it can skim into it from various substances. If consumed over an extended period of time, aluminum can result in damage to the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and heart.

Silica is an inorganic chemical that can be found naturally occurring in the water supply or it can skim into it from various substances. If consumed over an extended period of time, this chemical can result in health problems such as damage to bones and even cancer!

  1. Radionuclides:

Radioactive Substances emit ionizing radiation. In many cases, this dangerous contaminant skims into it from industrial waste or is added to tap water as a cleansing agent. If consumed over an extended period of time, radioactive substances can result in serious health problems such as cancer and even death!

  1. Contamination Attribution:

Turbidity is a cloudiness of water caused by finely divided particles in suspension. It is an important indicator of water quality.

Turbidity can be caused by things such as clay, silt, or plankton. Surface runoff from construction sites, agricultural activities, and forestry are all common causes of increased turbidity levels in the lake. High turbidity levels can significantly reduce the amount of sunlight reaching underwater plant life. This is extremely detrimental to fish because it reduces their food supply, which can result in stress and illness.

Water Hardness – The amount of calcium and magnesium in the water. A high concentration of both can cause a variety of health problems such as the increased risk for cardiovascular disease, kidney stones, and gallstones.

What You Need To Know Before Buying A Water Filter:

Brand: There are many different water filter brands on the market and choosing between them can be challenging. In many cases, the company is only as good as their product warranty which should tell you a lot about what kind of quality to expect from these products. Many companies will advertise how long they’ve been in business but this doesn’t really tell you a lot about what kind of quality to expect from these products.

Filter Cartridge: Look for a water filter that uses an activated carbon block or granulated coconut shell carbon cartridge. In some cases, the more filters it has the better because this means that there will be more surface area available for filtration. Having more surface area available means that there will be fewer contaminants in your water for each filter!

Filter Longevity: The lifespan of these filters is typically around 6 months, after which point it’s recommended to replace them with a new one.

Water Capacity: Look for a system that holds at least 3 gallons of filtered water because this way it doesn’t need to be refilled very often. Another benefit is that the longer the re-filling process takes, the more likely you are to keep your children away from contaminated tap water!

Refilling Location: If possible, look for a system that can be easily refilled without having to worry about spilling or contaminating your filtered water. This will help ensure that you don’t contaminate your filtered water when refilling it.

Size: There are a variety of different sizes ranging from small to large. Some people have problems finding enough space under the sink for their kitchen faucet while others would rather not have a large cumbersome system in their home which is why this should be taken into consideration before buying one.

Filter Change Indicator: Look for a model which has a filter change indicator so that you don’t have to worry about when the right time might be to replace your filters because it’ll tell you!

Access To Filtration Location: Make sure that you don’t buy a product that makes changing the filter difficult because if it’s hard to get access, then you’re going to end up using a lot of unnecessary water just to flush it out which can result in a whole bunch of different problems. Make sure that the system is easy to access so you don’t have to worry about flooding your kitchen or bathroom!

Conclusion

Water filters are a great way to help improve the quality of your drinking water without having to spend hundreds on bottled water every month! By investing in one of these systems, you can greatly improve the quality of your drinking water and enjoy healthier, cleaner pool water for years to come.

Read more:

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